Nature in all its beauty, large and small

Photographed at Green Cape Light-house, Sapphire Coast, South-Eastern Australia.

Nature, in all its splendour, how good is it, hey…!

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.Cheers, Baz & Janet

Here comes the Sun…

Twofold Bay, Sapphire Coast, South-Eastern Australia.

Ps: It has to be the best part of the day, hey…!

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Sparkling like a Jewel, the Sapphire Coast…

Twofold Bay, Sapphire Coast, South-Eastern Australia…

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.Cheers, Baz & Janet

The Sapphire Coast, nature’s paradise…

Nestled on the southern coastline of New South Wales is an area they call nature’s paradise, the Sapphire Coast…

A spectacular region where the ocean is a deep blue and mountain ranges teeming with Australia’s unique wildlife roll down to the Tasman Sea.

With the weather heating up in the Australian Outback we are heading for the cooler climes of the Sapphire Coast where we will set up camp on the shores of Twofold Bay, which incidentally is the third deepest natural harbour in the Southern Hemisphere.

Our banana lounges are loaded in our camper trailer, a Track Tvan, as they are perfect for an afternoon nap after a morning of kayaking in the Bay and fossicking along the shoreline.

Sounds idyllic, doesn’t it…!

Well, we’ll let you in on a little secret, it is. 

But rest assured, we will take the time to share this beautiful part of Australia’s magnificent coastline in photographs over the coming weeks.

And hey, stay safe in this COVID world…

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Blooming, in the Australian Outback…

The colours of the Australian Outback are spectacular, red ochre earth bordered by a deep blue sky.

And just add water and the country truly comes alive in a wash of colour.  Far Western New South Wales has been fortunate to receive much needed rain recently and the country is now showcasing its true beauty…

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Utes in the Paddock, a Quirky Display…

Travellers to the town of Condobolin in the Central West of New South Wales are greeted with an unusual display of old Holden Utes.

The project was the brainchild of a local landowner after seeing a similar display on a trip to the United States. 

Residents from the area donated Utes and many talented and well-known artists brought them to life with some unique and quirky artwork.

As they say, old Holden’s never die…!

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Cheers, Baz & Janet

The Dingo Fence…

The fence stretches across outback Australia and is approximately 5,600 kilometres in length…

Photographed on Pine View Station located on the New South Wales and South Australian Border.

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Cheers, Baz & Janet

A Carpet of Wildflowers, in the Australian Outback

The Australian Outback is a dry and parched land, but add water and it puts on a brilliant display of colour…

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Sunset, through the prism of the dingo fence…

A spectacular sunset in Outback Australia captured from Stony Hill on Pine View Station.

Pine View Station, located in the Strzelecki Desert approximately 200 kilometres north of Broken Hill, is a sheep station that borders the dingo fence in far-western New South Wales.

Fortunately the property has had some rain in the past couple of months, two-inches, and it is the first rain they have seen in four years…

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Cheers, Baz & Janet

And the Band Played On, an outback tribute…

The far western New South Wales town of Broken Hill in Outback Australia would seemingly be an odd place to find a memorial to the courageous band members aboard the ill stricken luxury liner, the Titanic.

But, pride of place in a park near to the town’s centre stands tall a monument erected in 1912 by the citizens of the town.

The monument praises the heroic bandsmen, who played to the end, calmly facing certain death whilst women, children and their fellow men were launching into lifeboats on that fateful maiden voyage of the Titanic. Survivors’ speak of the music drifting across the ocean’s waves as the ship slowly sank into the inky depths of the Atlantic.

And given the strong musical traditions of Broken Hill and the important role it played in community life, especially in those early days of the 1900’s, it is no surprise they gave pause to remember those who perished at sea that night.

Inscribed on the monument are the musical notes to the song “Nearer, My God, To Thee”, which has been reported as the final song the band played.

And the band played on…

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Sunset, in the Australian Outback…

Lake Pamamaroo, Outback Australia…

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Deadman’s Point…

Lake Cargelligo, located in the Central West of New South Wales, is a picturesque town located on the shores of a lake with the same name. 

It is just the perfect place to wile away a couple of days basking under the canopy of a blue and cloudless sky.

A pleasant way to take in the lake and surrounds is along a walking track beside the waters edge, and curious, we headed to investigate why one of the points of land on the lake was called “Deadman’s Point”.

The story is told of two men arriving in the town during the depression years, with no money, food or swags, just the clothes on their backs.

Hungry, the men tried to catch some fish to eat and found some string to make a fishing line.  With no luck fishing from the banks of the lake they decided their chances would improve if they were able to drop a line in the deeper water.

Making a raft from some empty kerosene tins and timber saplings the men paddled into deeper water, but were set upon by a strong wind blowing across the lake. They lost their grip on the raft and it floated away.

One of the men could not swim and whilst his mate tried to keep him afloat he slipped beneath the water and drowned.

The survivor headed to town where he informed the police of the mishap and told them there was a dead man “around there”. The police asked “where” and the reply was “there is a man lying dead on the point” And thereafter it has been known as Deadman’s Point.

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Cheers, Baz & Janet

A Birthing Suite, in the Australian Bush…

One of the most enjoyable things about travelling is the opportunity it provides to learn something new, to visit faraway places, and to even make discoveries in your own backyard.

We came across a new discovery for us as we head towards the dog fence in far western New South Wales. Well actually, it is as far west as you can travel in New South Wales as it marks the border with South Australia.

Now don’t go thinking we’ve made some amazing discovery that hasn’t previously been recorded, however we came across Borenore Karst Conservation Reserve, situated just west of Orange. We’ve passed the Reserve many times in our travels but have never stopped there, but a chance lunch stop provided an opportunity to visit and to view the limestone cave located there.

Arch Cave and Boree Creek, which runs through the cave, is in Wiradyuri Country and has been used by our First Nations People for thousand’s of years.

The name Borenore is thought to be derived from the indigenous language of the Wiradyuri people; Bora, meaning ceremony, and Nora, meaning shelf or overhanging rock.

There are approximately 400 Karst Caves located in New South Wales and they are amongst the oldest and most complex in the world.

Caves similar to Arch Cave have been used by aboriginal women as birthing sites in days gone by and without doubt it would be a wonderful place to enter the world.

So if you’re out that way, be sure to stop by and take a look, have a picnic and enjoy one of the walks, it’s a magical spot that will delight any visitor…

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Cheers, Baz & Janet

The Dog Fence…

The Dog Fence is a remarkable structure that stretches across Australia’s Southern Region.

Built in the 1880s, the fence is designed to keep the dingo, Australia’s native dog, out of the South-Eastern part of Australia.

Today you won’t find too many pure bred dingoes in Australia, but there are still plenty of wild dogs.

The fence is the longest in the world stretching 5,600 kilometres from the Darling Downs in Queensland to the Great Australian Bight in South Australia…

We’ll be tracking sections of the fence over the next couple of weeks in Australia’s remote outback.

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Cheers, Baz & Janet

The Corner Country, Outback Australia…

This coming week we are heading out to tour this wonderful part of Australia, although the Corona Virus restrictions will limit our travel to New South Wales only…

Our plan is to meander through Western New South Wales, and then north along the border between New South Wales and South Australia.

There is so much history in the region to explore and with recent rains we expect the country will be in great shape.

Hopefully we’ll get some warmer weather…!

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Whispers from the past…

Standing amongst the wooden and corrugated iron buildings in the old silver mining town of Yerranderie, my mind’s eye could hear the whispers, the laughter of people long gone drifting on the breeze…

Yerranderie is a small bush town not too far from the centre of the bustling metropolis of Australia’s capital city, Sydney – at least as the crow flies.

In reality it is about a six-hour drive, depending on the route you take.

The town is nestled beneath Bartlett’s Head, an impressive rock that stands proud and from its vantage point provides a wonderful panoramic view of the surrounding bush and the Kanangra Boyd Wilderness Area.

The hike to the top is well worth the effort and takes little more than an hour.

And at day’s end there is a rich golden glow as the setting sun reflects off its cliff walls before it glides below the mountain peaks, beyond the horizon, heralding in nightfall as wombats awaken from their daytime burrows…

From Bartlett’s Head you can view the Burragorang Valley and backwaters of Warragamba Dam, which provides Sydney with its water supply.

Prior to the construction of the dam in the late 1950s the Burragorang Valley was home to a small farming community and it provided a more direct access route to Yerranderie from the township of Camden to Sydney’s south-west.

Yerranderie has a history closely linked to the people of Burragorang Valley…

On Easter Sunday a service is held in the local Catholic Church to commemorate the pioneering people of the valley and their association with the town.

An opportunity for old friends to “catch-up”…

Whilst it is a reasonable trek to get to this little gem in the Australian Bush, if you have an adventurous spirit, enjoy a freshness in the air that only the mountains can provide, and a day or two to spare, I encourage you to pack some camping gear and your favourite bottle of red wine to share with friends around the warmth of a glowing campfire – better still pack another bottle and stay one more night!

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Cheers, Baz & Janet

A Whilsting Kite, in the Australian Bush…

The Whistling Kite, a magnificent bird of prey that is found throughout Australia.

Its presence usually announced by a distinctive whistle

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Majestic, in black…

Australia has many types of black cockatoos, this beautiful bird; the Red-Tailed Black Cockatoo is a familiar sight in the Australian Bush…

But we never grow tired of spotting and photographing them.

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Splendid, in pink…

Australia’s Major Mitchell Cockatoo, commonly known as the pink cockatoo, is one of our most beautiful birds.

A delicate splash of pink creating a wonderful contrast in its usual habitat, Australia’s semi-arid regions.

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching the blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Smile, just smile…

Crazy times we live in at the moment, hey…!

Perhaps our world is always crazy, one-way or another, sometimes good crazy, and at other times, bad crazy.

One remedy to help through the “bad crazy” that has survived the test of time is to simply live in the moment and smile.

Surely we can all find something to smile at…hey?

And talk about smiling, the clock has just ticked into the cocktail hour, well it has in our part of the world…

So in our mind’s eye” and with a smile on our face we’re jumping back into this beautiful Ratua Island sunset where we’ll drink a toast to the health and well-being of all our friends.

Photos: Janet & Baz

About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the red earth touching a blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a warm turquoise blue sea…

A few years ago we graduated from work and re-entered the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Tumbling from the Jetty

Hey, how good is this wonderful Silo Art.

Located in the small coastal town of Tumby Bay on the Eyre Peninsular in South Australia, the artwork depicts two boys jumping into the cool waters of the Spencer Gulf from the local jetty on a hot summers day…

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

A few years ago we decided it was time to graduate from work and re-enter the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Australian Birds – The Gang-Gang Cockatoo

Have you ever heard a ‘creaky door’ whilst Out and About in the Australian Bush…? If you have chances are this magnificent cockatoo may have been the culprit.

Their screech is unmistakable – the sound of a creaky door.

We photographed this wonderful pair at Shallow Inlet Conservation Reserve on Wilsons Promontory.

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

A few years ago we decided it was time to graduate from work and re-enter the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Tibooburra and the Corner Country…

Tibooburra, nestled in the far north west of New South Wales, speaks loudly of Australia’s Corner Country and will be a town familiar to many outback travellers.

An area rich in aboriginal culture and a place of early European settlement, Tibooburra’s remoteness is matched by the tenacity of the characters that live and work in this arid outback environment.

Numerous explorers’ have visited the region over the years, most notably Charles Sturt as he went in search of an inland sea.

And it has had its fair share of modern day visitors, including Clifton Pugh, the famous Australian artist who painted a mural on one of the walls of the Family Hotel. In fact he even owned the pub at one time.

And for a very short period in its early history the area experienced a gold rush of sorts. But as was normally the case on many of the goldfields, it was the storekeepers supplying provisions to hopeful prospectors and the pubs serving grog to thirsty miners that struck the most gold…

Although, they do say patient prospectors may still be able to find a nugget or two. And if you manage to find one, or even if you don’t, there is always a cold beer to be found in one of the town’s two pubs.

Whilst we are advocates for responsible drinking, a cold beer in hand is a pleasant way to spend days end as the sun slides gently below the western horizon.

australian pubs

And be sure to visit the information centre which has a wealth of information on Australia’s First Nation People as well as other topical information that will assist visitors get the most out of a trip into Sturt National Park.

And, if travelling to Innamincka don’t overlook taking a route often less trodden that takes you through the spectacularly beautiful jump-up country before passing through the iconic dog-fence at Toona Gate.

Heading north from Tibooburra you will traverse sand dune country, passing Omnicron Lake, which will most likely be dry, and Epsilon Station, before joining the northern section of the Bore Track.

The track exits just east of Cullyamurra waterhole and is clearly marked on most maps.

The northern section of the Bore Track is well worth the effort and be sure to drop by and visit the place that Robert O’Hara Burke was reported to have died, a peaceful resting spot beside the waterhole not far from the Innamincka township.

The region is a destination in its own right, so don’t just pass through, add a few days to your trip and immerse yourself in all it has to offer…

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

A few years ago we decided it was time to graduate from work and re-enter the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Australian Birds – The King Parrot

We photographed this wonderful pair at Jingellic, a town that sits on the border of Victoria and New South Wales where the Murray River flows by.

Whenever in the bush we are always on the lookout for an opportunity to identify and photograph our wonderful native birds.  And we are certainly not experts on either of those two counts, so sometimes we just take the time to sit down and observe.

A pretty good way to pass the time, don’t you reckon, hey…?

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

A few years ago we decided it was time to graduate from work and re-enter the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Silo Art, pollinating our countryside…

The painting of murals on the many stark looking grain silos that dot Australia’s rural landscape has been a relatively new and welcome trend.

They have given a much-needed economic boost to many country towns as tourists’ criss-cross the roads often less travelled in search of this art form…

And it is not hard to be impressed by these murals, some that pay homage to an individual, others a town or region, and in some cases, the fabric of our nation.

In the Central West township of Dunedoo, artist Peter Mortimore was well advanced in painting a tribute on the town’s silo to Winks, Australia’s much loved super-racehorse, when we passed through recently.

Hugh Bowman, Wink’s regular jockey, was born in Dunedoo and provides the connection for the mural, one that he features in.

Silo Art is limited only by imagination and it is hard not too marvel at the precision and perspective that many of the murals provide, especially given the size of the ‘canvas’ that the artists’ are working with.

In a park next to the rail-siding in the small Victorian town of Goorambat we sat in the shadow of the silos proudly displaying beautiful artwork. And truly, these are masterpieces of the highest order.

Whilst we photographed the murals from every possible angle, ensuring that we didn’t miss a perspective, Keith, a long-term resident sat quietly with an array of tea-towels and postcards for sale showcasing this beautiful art work. The proceeds from these sales go towards the upgrade of visitor facilities in this small town.

We clicked away before taking a walk up the main street, towards the pub and past the town’s community hall where we made what we thought was an amazing discovery, well for us at least.

Set in stone at the front of the hall was a plaque commemorating the Royal visit of Queen Elizabeth to Goorambat in 1954.

Now there is no reason why the Queen shouldn’t choose to visit Goorambat, but we were intrigued to learn more about the visit. 

We were hopeful Keith would still be at the park and that he would be able to share some knowledge of the Queen’s visit.

Keith’s story and personal account of that day evolved like a good novel by the fire on a cold night.

And not only about the Queen’s visit all those years ago, but also of his family, its connection to the town and region, of how his grandfather built the home he and his wife of over sixty-years live in today.

Keith spoke about the good times and the bad times, a familiar feast and famine story of our harsh land, and how Goorambat’s fortunes were affected by ‘progress’ over the years.

“What about the Royal visit?” we asked…

Keith paused, as though surveying a time long past in his mind.

Clearly, his memory of the event was as fresh as the day the Royal train pulled into the siding.

“The lead-up to the visit was a hive of activity,” he recounted.

“We were newly married and in our early twenties”, Keith recalled.  “There was a bustle like never seen before as the women baked and the men cleaned and painted every surface that could be found, and then more”.

He laughed…

After all, this would be the Queen’s first and last visit to Goorambat, of that he was certain, so everything had to be perfect…

“Simply perfect”, he said.

Seemingly, it was deemed that noise from passing trains along the main train line between Sydney and Melbourne would disturb Her Majesty’s sleep and that a siding off the main route would be selected for her overnight stay in country Victoria.

Keith surmised the bidding must have been intense for the right to host the Royal visit and with much pride and a wink, he said Goorambat was chosen and the rest is history.

That night, as the embers glowed in the campfire, we reflected on the possibility that Silo Art was to a town like colour is to a flower. Its artistic beauty drawing you towards something special, a story to be told and recounted, to be pollinated so it lives on…

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

A few years ago we decided it was time to graduate from work and re-enter the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Budgerigars, at home in the Australian Bush…

Photographed at Mutawintji National Park, Outback Australia…

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

A few years ago we decided it was time to graduate from work and re-enter the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Haunting Beauty, Sculptures shaped by the shifting sands of time…

Australia is a parched and dry continent surrounded by ocean and is notable for many things. Unique wildlife abounds, rainforest canopies reach out to coral reefs in our northern parts, deep blue skies touching red sand dunes in our deserts lands.

It is also a country that has had the footprint of time etched into its landscape over the Millennia by a proud people, Australia’s first Nation People and in more recent times by European settlement.

Heading north after a very pleasant stay at the Homebush Hotel in Penarie we continue our journey through the western parts of New South Wales to the World Heritage Willandra Lakes Region and our destination, Mungo National Park.

For many, this is a special place in our landscape, both physically and spiritually and is home to the oldest human remains in Australia.  Buried in the land are artefacts and evidence of a continuous record of aboriginal occupation for over 50,000 years.

On our travels we usually take a kayak to assist us in exploring our waterways, whether it be our spectacular coastline, an inland river or lake, or even a billabong or waterhole nestled in the landscape.  However, there is no water in this area of note, in fact Lake Mungo hasn’t had water flowing into it for thousand’s of years.

Consequently, the red dust accumulated from days of outback travel remains encrusted on the kayak…!

The park, which is run and managed by Aboriginal Rangers, only reopened in the days leading up to our visit. With the potential for the Covid-19 virus to weave its tentacles into our indigenous communities many national parks in the area have been closed over the past few weeks.

Our campsite at Mungo Lodge, a private facility situated just outside of the National Park, is a wonderful base to explore the area from. A highlight is the magnificent ‘Mungo Lunette’ that stands out on the horizon.

There is a large woolshed on display and a loop drive through the park where you can marvel at the tenacity of the Cob and Co Coach drivers’ who guided their horses and rigs over the soft sand dunes as they made their way to these remote settlements.

 It would have been no mean feat…

We have endeavoured to capture some of the beauty of this region in our photographs, taken at the Lunette on sunset, and there is much that can be written about Mungo and the Willandra Lakes Region.

However, we feel it is a story better told through the eyes of the people who have left their footprints in this sandy landscape over the Millennia – since their ‘Dreamtime’.

Be sure to visit to learn more…!

Photos: Janet & Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

A few years ago we decided it was time to graduate from work and re-enter the classroom of life, where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet

A watering hole in the bush…

Quenching your thirst is basic to human survival, no more so than whilst travelling our magnificent country. Mind you, quenching your thirst may take many different forms and how you quench it depend on the era you grew up in… 

For Australia’s First Nation People, living near a permanent waterhole on our parched continent has been key to their survival for over sixty thousand years. In seasons of good rains, which are infrequent, they were able stretch out their area of reach, travelling from rock hole to rock hole, in search of food and to trade.  Dreamtime stories providing the roadmap to those faraway rock holes.

With the coming of European settlement, watering holes morphed into hotels and inns, pubs where horses could be watered and where you could get a bed for the night.  And most importantly, where one could wash down the dust from their dry throat after a day ‘on the wallaby’. 

In some cases these watering holes were little more than a shanty with calico walls, where the company was rough and the liquor even rougher still…!

Distances between these establishments was nominal in modern day estimation, usually the distance a horse might be able to travel in a day, perhaps even less so.

These days our travel is usually in an air-conditioned vehicle with little consideration needed other than to fill it up with go-juice to keep it going, which might be petrol or diesel. And long distances are covered between resting times.

Yes, cars need to be serviced, but unless you’re driving a Landrover most vehicles don’t need to be regularly rested like a horse. 

And a note for Landrover owners, we consider ourselves entitled to make Landrover jokes having once owned two Landrover Defenders at the same time, although we have disposed of them and happy to report we are now fully recovered from the experience and leading happy lives once again (tongue firmly in cheek… 😉 )

Anyway…

As we make our way west across the Hay Plain we have been reflecting on some of the pubs we’ve visited in our travels, the characters we’ve met, the tales we’ve heard and the ales we’ve drunk. 

And hey, if you’re travelling out this way and looking for a good spot to camp take the time to check out Sandy Point along the Murrumbidgee River. 

It is a free camp you’ll be sharing with other travellers, but there is plenty of room and it is only a short walking distance into the township of Hay where you’ll find a couple of watering holes in the main street.

And be sure to take the time to visit the Shearer’s Hall of Fame whilst you’re visiting. 

As we made our way further west towards Balranald and a rendezvous with our life-long friends and travelling partners we were giving some thought to where we might stay for the night as the camp area near the old woolshed in Yanga National Park was closed due to recent rains.

And as luck would have it, we discovered the Homebush Hotel at Penarie, which is located on the road towards Ivanhoe and about 30-kilometres north of Balranald.  

Now when we say ‘we discovered’ it is worth noting that the pub was built in 1878 and today it is the only roadside inn that has survived along the road to Ivanhoe. 

We put a phone call in to ‘Nugget’ the publican to check the pub was open.  

And in these Covid times it does pay to check.

“No worries”, Nugget said, and not long after leaving Balranald we had set-up ‘camp’ behind the pub and enjoying a beer beside the warmth of the fire, a central feature in the bar of the pub. 

And you’ve got to like Outback hospitality. Providing you spend a few dollars in the pub you can camp out back for free…! 

Hey, it is no resort, but that suits us fine and it is always nice to get a hot shower in when you can.

Now legend has it that Nugget, in his younger days, was a delivery boy and pizza maker for Eagleboy Pizza’s and even featured in one of its television ads.  

Of this we have no doubt. 

So if you ever stop by at the Homebush Hotel you can’t go wrong ordering one of Nugget’s pizzas, we did and we are still raving about it.

But here’s the thing, next time you’re in an old bush pub like the Homebush take the time to stop and listen ‘cause above the crackle of the fire, or the din of the chatter, you might just hear the voices and laughter of the characters that have long passed…if only the walls could talk, hey…?

Photos: Janet & Baz

About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

In 2017 we decided it was time to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Early to bed, and early to rise, makes a person healthy, wealthy and wise…

There is something very pleasing about having our touring vehicle pointed down the driveway towards the front gate, standing at the ready like a trusty friend and prepped for another adventure with our camper trailer in tow.

We enjoy the anticipation of a trip building in the lead-up to the day of departure, the chatter about places we will visit and in many cases revisit providing a wonderful mood and spring to our step.

Mind you our departure these days is usually marked with a hasty good-bye with our son, who, with bleary eyes, usually arises from his slumber just in the nick of time to wave us through the gate. 

Motoring along the freeway, the escape route from our urban confines, we reflect on past trips when TomO, once dubbed the walking hat, would happily be strapped into his car seat, colouring books and other travel distracting paraphernalia at hand. 

How things change, hey…?

TomO – The Walking Hat

The little bloke never knew if he was heading down the street to the local shop, or halfway around Australia on an Outback Adventure…

But that’s a story for another time, today we are heading to the small town of Jugiong, about 350 kilometres to the south west of Sydney, as we make our way into the Australian Outback for a few weeks of touring. 

Like many towns along the main road connecting Sydney and Melbourne, Jugiong is easily by-passed these days as one travels by at a hundred or so kilometres per hour.  But with time our own since graduating from work we detour frequently, investigating many of the places that were once a blur in the windscreen as we headed to a destination constrained by the bonds of school and work timetables.

And as we warmed ourselves with coffee from the thermos a couple of hours into our journey at Gunning, a historical town along today’s route, we joked that maybe TomO was still sound asleep in bed. 

We laughed, given the wind chill in the air could you blame him…?

We have struggled with the cold of a southern winter and console ourselves with thoughts of a warm campfire, vowing they would be a feature of this trip that would take us to far-western New South Wales. To be honest, they are a feature of most of our trips if conditions are suitable and the taking of firewood has minimal impact on the area.

In our defence we did grow up in the tropics and spent time living in Papua New Guinea, but you’d think that after 30 or more years we’d be growing more accustomed to the cold – not…!

And for those who haven’t travelled through the Australian Outback in winter, rest assured, it can be freezing cold as the sun’s rays withdraw their warmth from the wide-open plains. But the draw of deep blue skies touching a faraway horizon of parched red-earth has provided us with some immunity to the cold, but glorious starry nights. 

By mid afternoon we were pulling into the Jugiong showground that is situated alongside the banks of the Murrumbidgee River. The showground Trust asks for a small donation for the privilege of staying in this picturesque spot and we gladly oblige.  

As usual, there was a few other travellers’ set-up, some already preparing for the common place ritual of happy hour, where seemingly anonymous travellers’ share jokes and stories like old friends. 

Opposite are a couple of shops, one selling local produce and gelato, another selling local wines. 

The Long-Track Pantry café is a great place for a coffee, or lingering lunch, and the Sir George Hotel that has been renovated to its previous glory in recent years stands proudly on the street corner.  

After a day of driving, well not quite a day, we stretch our legs with a walk across to the other side of the river via a causeway and up a hill where you get a great view of the town and surrounding countryside.  

Being in the throes of winter the days are much shorter and with the sun fast sliding towards the western horizon the temperature was starting to drop. We took this as our cue to head back to “camp” for an easy pre-prepared meal, before heading to a warm fire and a glass of locally produced wine at the Sir George Hotel.

Over many years of travel we have learnt that plans usually never go to plan, so to speak, which sometimes adds to the experience.  In this case thoughts of a warm fire and that glass of red were going to be just that, thoughts, as to our dismay we discovered the Sir George was only open to dinner and drinks for resident guests on Monday nights…!

Perhaps this was due to the new order of life living with the Corona Virus, or maybe it is always the case, and as we walked back to our camper trailer, a Track Tvan, we quickly decided that a book, a queen bed covered in a dooner and warm blankets was very appealing even if the sun had only just disappeared.

It is only 6 o’clock and we are tucked up in bed. As we turned out the light we hoped there is some truth in the old adage – Early to bed, and early to rise, makes a person healthy and wise!

Photos: Janet & Baz

About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

In 2017 we decided it was time to “graduate from work” and re-enter the classroom of life where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet

The Murrumbidgee River, snaking its way across a Sunburnt Land…

Finally, we have again broken the boundaries of our urban existence, making our way into the great Australian Outback where deep blue skies touch a red ochre land on a faraway horizon.

The country is green after much needed rains and the mighty Murrumbidgee River is flowing, snaking its way across a sunburnt land.

The Murrumbidgee has been the lifeblood to both first nations people of Australia and in more recent times to European settlers.  And we are taking advantage of a beautiful campsite alongside the “Bidgee” at Sandy Point near the township of Hay in Western New South Wales.

Photos: Baz and Janet


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

In 2017 we decided it was time to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Outback Australia Beckons…

Like most people we have had plenty of time to reflect over these past few months of “lock-down” as the world has come to grips with a pandemic unlike anything we have seen in our lifetime.

And our hearts go out to those who have lost loved ones and friends to the dreadful virus and to the many affected by the economic consequences that the virus has drowned us in…

Often it takes an ‘out of the blue’ experience to jolt us into realising the things that are important to us, to value life, and above all else, to simply live in the moment.

And now that we are once again able to travel within this great country of ours, albeit with some restrictions still in place, we are going to skip down the driveway and out the front gate in the next few days to soak up some red dust and blue skies in the vast Australian Outback…

About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

In 2017 we decided it was time to “graduate from work” and re-enter the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Isolation, in the Australian Outback…

Canning Stock Route, Outback Australia…

Photo: Baz


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

In 2017 we decided it was time to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Secluded…

Honeymoon Beach, Moreton Island, Australia…

Photo: Baz

About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

In 2017 we decided it was time to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Life, in the Australian Bush…

Australia’s unique wildlife…

Photo: Baz

About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

In 2017 we decided it was time to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet

Sunset, in the Australian Outback…

Milparinka, Outback Australia…

Photo: Baz

About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

In 2017 we decided it was time to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet

A Bush Breakfast…

Australian Bush

And not a care in the world…

Photo: Baz

About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

In 2017 we decided it was time to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet

The Desert meets the Bush – Outback Australia

Welford National Park, Far Western Queensland…

Photos: Baz and Janet-Planet

About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

In 2017 we decided it was time to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.Thanks for joining us in the adventure…! 

Baz & Janet-Planet

Blue Skies…

Outback Australia


Hey, whilst we are in difficult times, there is way too much negativity around, especially if you listen to the 24-hour news cycle.

There is much to be hopeful about and this time will pass. 

Hopefully this photo helps lift your day which we captured on a trip to the spectacularly beautiful Australian Gulf Savannah on one of our many outback trips…

There is always a blue sky – sometimes you just have to look for it.

About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

In 2017 we decided it was time to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet

A Desert Dweller – in the Australian Outback…

Great Victoria Desert, Outback Australia…

About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

A couple of years ago we decided it was time to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet-Planet

Uninhabitable – in the Australian Outback

Maralinga, Outback Australia

About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

A couple of years ago we decided it was time to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet-Planet

Rolling Hills…in the Flinders Ranges

About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

A couple of years ago we decided it was time to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet-Planet

First Light…In the Australian Outback

Welford National Park

Welford National Park, Outback Australia…


About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

A couple of years ago we decided it was time to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet-Planet

Last Light…In the Australian Outback

Milparinka, Outback Australia…

About us…

We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

A couple of years ago we decided it was time to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet-Planet

Weight Restricted Roads – It doesn’t apply to me (does it?)

Increasingly, it appears these weight-restricting signs are appearing on our roads, especially in metropolitan areas where they are usually put in place by local government authorities.

In NSW the Roads and Maritime Services (RMS) look after major roads and local government authorities lesser local roads within its area.

Many will be familiar with these signs restricting vehicles over 3,000kg (usually marked 3-ton) from travelling along a particular road or street. Usually the sign has a “truck” picture on it; similar to the one in the photograph possibly leading drivers to form an opinion it does not refer to standard SUV style vehicles.

And I must note that frequently these signs are not obvious, hidden behind foliage on a tree, which perhaps is another problem altogether when it comes to road signs…!

But what is the implication of these weight-restricted roads for today’s modern four-wheel drive vehicles?

A quick look at many of the popular four-wheel drive vehicles on the market today, including the Nissan Patrol and the popular Toyota 78 and 79 Series show that they all have a standard GVM in excess of 3,000kg.  Put a couple of adults and some luggage in any of these vehicles along with a full tank of fuel and they will most likely be weighing in excess of 3,000kg.

And it is worth noting many weight-restricted roads have a “GVM Limit” of 3 ton, so the popular range of four-wheel drive vehicles I’ve noted are impacted, regardless of what they weigh in at on the road.

We have a Toyota 79 Series with a GVM of 3,780kg (standard is 3,300kg) and it usually weighs in at around 3,500kg in its touring configuration.

Toyota 79 Series

But, 3-ton means 3-ton even if it doesn’t look like a truck and more like a passenger vehicle.

Possibly many may be of the view that the sign does not refer to their vehicle and be travelling on them unaware of the implications it might have, especially in the case of an accident.

Perhaps others simply ignore the directive.

If you have comprehensive insurance on your vehicle, and who doesn’t these days, you will find that one of the first things it will say in the PDS is that you are “covered anywhere you are legally entitled to be”.

And it pays to reflect on that statement – anywhere you are legally entitled to be…

The implication for those with vehicles weighing over 3-ton or with a GVM in excess of 3-ton is that travelling on a weight restricted road might void your ability to make an insurance claim if it relates to an accident on that weight restricted road.

I am insured with the popular four-wheel drive specialist underwriter, Club 4×4, and I have confirmed with them that my interpretation is correct – if you are not legally entitled to travel on a road due to it being weight restricted you will be in breach of the terms and conditions of the policy.

Now maybe that interpretation is the default position from the insurer in the first instance, but the implication is clear, a claim might be denied…

And given underwriting standards and interpretations of terms and conditions are fairly standard across the automotive insurance companies you will find they’ll all mostly likely arrive at the same conclusion.

Now there might be a couple of caveats on that view depending on the specific circumstances, but it is usually with great certainty that whenever “grey area meets legal implications” it will cost you money to prosecute your case.

Local government authorities when restricting roads and streets to weight are required to provide an alternative for vehicles in excess of the weight restriction. I live in an area of Sydney that has numerous 3-ton weight-restricted roads and there are alternatives.

But it is a minefield of sorts, especially if travelling in areas you are less familiar with. And a review of a number of GPS mapping systems highlights that none appear to give the user an option to avoid weight-restricted roads, at least not in the systems usually associated with SUV type vehicles.

As with most things in life, it is never a problem, until it becomes a problem.

It is unlikely you will be booked by the local government authority enforcement officers or police for travelling along a weight-restricted road in your four-wheel drive vehicle if the tare weight is under 3-ton. After all, it would need to be weighed to determine if it is under or over. But if you are involved in an accident where there is an injury, or worse, the vehicle may be put over the scales and you may find you will face a charge of negligence if over 3-ton, depending on the circumstances, which is not a traffic violation but a criminal charge.

The question needs to be asked is why are there an increasing number of weight-restricted roads being introduced, maybe it is time for the four-wheel drive lobby groups to become active in this regard.

Perhaps many are blissfully unaware of the implications of weight-restricted roads, especially with regard to insurance and personal liability – but 3-ton, is 3-ton, regardless of the vehicle you are driving, it doesn’t apply to just trucks, so keep an eye out for those weight-restricted roads….

About us…

We have always loved the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

A couple of years ago we decided that after many years of paid and unpaid work that it was time for us to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Cheers, Baz & Janet-Planet

Janet-Planet & Baz

Murphy’s Haystacks, golden and glowing…

Located on the picturesque Eyre Peninsular a short drive from the fishing community of Streaky Bay, Murphy’s Haystacks stand proudly in an ancient landscape framed by a deep blue sky.

Some might say that they look like “molars”, well perhaps a dentist might, in fact they are known as Isenberg’s, which are best described as a hill that looks like a rocky island rising from the sea.

So, how did they get to become known as Murphy’s Haystacks?

Folklore relates a story of a Scottish Agriculture expert who proclaimed that to grow good hay farmers needed to harrow their land for the best result. While travelling by coach he noticed the rock formation in the distance and advised his fellow passengers that this farmer harrowed his land to produce so much “hay”.

The rocks, being on Murphy’s property, became known as Murphy’s Haystacks and passing coachmen described them as haystacks to their passengers from that day onwards…

About us…

 We love the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

 A couple of years ago we decided it was time to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

 Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

 Cheers, Baz & Janet-Planet

Janet-Planet & Baz

Diesel and Dust (An Australian Classic)

Diesel and Dust

If you travel the breadth of Australia, across its vast open plains and wide-open skies, you are bound to experience plenty of Diesel and Dust…

And doing it in summer you can experience some extremes of temperature and just recently we recorded an outside temperature of 50 degrees Celsius.

So with those types of temperatures we decided it best we lay up somewhere cool for a couple of days and there has been no better place to do that than Burra in South Australia

Burra, or Kooringa as it was originally named, was Australia’s first surveyed mining town.  And in the early 1850s it was Australia’s largest inland town and boasted the famous “Monster Mine” which was established after shepherds discovered copper in the rocky outcrops near Burra Burra Creek.

Monster Mine

History doesn’t record the shepherds as becoming rich from the discovery, but it certainly made its many shareholders wealthy over time.

Speaking of time, it has almost stood still in Burra, which is now on the Register of the National Estate and many of its buildings are listed on the Heritage Register.

And the fans of the Australian Rock Band Midnight Oil will recognise the “Old Burra Homestead” which proudly stands in a paddock on the outskirts of town.

Diesel and Dust, hey we’ll take that any day.

About us…

We have always loved the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

 A couple of years ago we decided that it was time for us to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

 Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

 Cheers, Baz & Janet-Planet (Barry & Janet O’Malley)

A giant wave that no surfer can ride (In the Australian Outback…)

Catching a wave is usually associated with a trip to the beach during our long, hot and lazy Australian summers.

But this is one Wave that no surfer can ride; in fact you won’t even find it rolling in off the ocean.

This “Wave” is situated in the wheat belt growing region of West Australia and is quite a remarkable rock formation in the Australian bush. It stands at 15 metres tall and 110 metres long and whilst you can’t “ride” it water still was a major contributor to its formation.

Tiny lichens, moss, and algae resulting in a marvelous contrast of orange and black produce the colour in the rock estimated to be thousand’s of millions of years old.

Wave Rock is part of the Hyden Rock formation and is well worth the visit, but hey, just a tip; leave your surfboard at home…!

Photos: Baz and Janet-Planet, Out & About in the Australian Outback…

About us…

We have always loved the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter…

A couple of years ago we decided that after many years of paid and unpaid work that it was time for us to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

Life on the edge – an encounter with a dragon (in the Australian Outback)

Australian Reptile

Oh, no need to worry…!

This wasn’t an encounter with the fire-breathing type of dragon ready to flash fry you you with a quick burst of flame.

No, this was an encounter with a rather cute reptile, aptly named the “Ornate Dragon”, that is barely bigger than the size of your foot and unlikely to do you any harm. We came across this wonderful reptile whilst visiting Wave Rock during our recent travel in West Australia.

Mind you, it took some skill and patience to capture them on camera as they scooted across the rock at a great pace, stopping only momentarily to bob their head up and down as well as doing some push-ups.

The head bobbing and push-ups are part of its mating ritual and from all the head bobbing and push-ups we observed there was little doubt the mating season was in full swing…

About us…

We have always loved the colours of the Australian Outback, the ochre red earth touching a deep blue sky on a faraway horizon; and the fabulous coastline of our sunburnt country, where a golden sandy beach is washed over by a turquoise blue sea; and the characters you meet in a quiet country pub, where it is nothing flash, but you are enriched by the encounter and the banter…

In 2017 we decided that after many years of paid and unpaid work that it was time for us to “graduate from work” and re-enter “the classroom of life” where an education is guaranteed and all that is needed is an open mind.

Thanks for joining us in the adventure…!

 

Torgadirrup Dreaming (Mind The Gap…)

The traditional custodians of this very beautiful part of Australia, the Mirnang people, tell the following story about this place.

Two Mirnang brothers had their differences and were fighting over a young woman. The elders became tired of their squabbling and sent them to a place near The Gap.

They made one stand on one side of The Gap and one on the other side. One brother was good at throwing spears, while the other was good at throwing boomerangs. As the first brother threw a boomerang, the second threw his spear.

The first brother was struck by the spear. The other brother was struck in the back by the boomerang. Both warriors fell into the water.

The brother who was  struck in the back by a boomerang turned into a shark. The fin on the shark is the boomerang. The brother who was hit by the spear turned into a stingray.

Dreamtime stories told by the Traditional Custodians are a wonderful way of gaining a better appreciation and understanding of our land and Janet and I seek them out wherever we travel in this great country of ours…

This story is recounted on a story board at The Gap and was made available by the sons of Norngen…

Photo’s: Baz – The Landy & Janet-Planet, South West, West Australia…

PS: And yes, it is a long way from our usual travel in the Australian Outback…!